Summer School in Global Studies and Critical Theory
 

PLANETARY URBANSCAPES

Bologna • June 24 – July 5, 2019

 

If yesterday the city was recognized as a distinctive and bounded type of settlement whose qualities resided in its sounds, rhythms and textures, today what “cities” or the “urban” are can no longer be taken for granted (see Robinson,2015).

Major shifts in urban studies have emerged through a new phase of planetary urbanization. A key manifestation of this phase is the emergence in the global South of new forms of urban landscapes of which the mega-city or meta-region phenomenon is a privileged instantiation, as Ananya Roy’s work has suggested.  Typical of this phase is also the offshore city, a physical, infrastructural and spatial assemblage which operates on the basis of internal self-containment.

Elsewhere, including in the North, cities are no longer one locality, but a complex of trans-localities, an entangled junction of multiple spatialities (see McGuirk, 2015). They are increasingly understood to be structures of feeling and affect, logistical sites and circulatory systems through which forms and bodies, goods and materials are moving and life itself is lived. They are sites of experimentation with shifting forms of governance and multi-scalar networking, while the development of urban social movements continually reframes the meaning and the scope of the “right to the city.” (Henri Lefebvre, 1968)

The 2019 Summer School will revisit early twenty-first century urban landscapes in light of these shifts. Particular attention will be paid to the extent to which their production is entangled with the movements of global capital and the vagaries of the world’s financial markets, at a time of enhanced computing and technological power, rising inequalities, escalating changes of the internal dynamics of the Earth System (see Kruth, 2018) and widespread popular authoritarianism. Of crucial importance will be the analysis of neoliberal policies based on partition from the poor city, of slum infrastructures both carrying the aftermaths, very often, of colonial violence; and of cities of extraction disconnected from histories of industrialisation. These broken landscapes, distorted by crime as well as by heterogeneous forms of public and private violence, are also often places of conviviality, unpredictable encounters, solidarity and unexpected forms of urban communing (see for example de Boeck, 2017).  To state the obvious, if the ancient polis was the origin of the concept of the political, we will be asking: what ideas of the political emerge in contemporary cityscapes?

Early twenty-first century urban landscapes are shaped by biophysical and chemical processes that transport and transform materials and energy and thus provide the conditions necessary for life. They are made and remade by changes in the climate system, including oceans and seas, wind, heat, precipitations and the atmosphere (see Derickson, 2017). Cities will be apprehended as aqueous territories capable of generating and guiding design with the environment as an active participant in the process Port cities and littoral cities in particular will be read from  their ocean edge, the materialities of their sea as well as its histories of slavery and maritime imperialism.

Finally we will pay attention to early twenty-first urban landscapes as much as works of the imagination as works of material social construction. Changing our emphasis to focus on flows and movement, migration and mediation more than on structures and settlements, we will assess the extent to which urban dwellers combine the reality of motion and the desire for stability.

Up to 40 participants will be selected and required to attend all plenary lectures, the two morning courses, and at least one afternoon class per week.

The Academy and other sponsors offer several grants covering fees, accomodation and/or travel.

 

MONDAY, JUNE 24
 
4.30 pm
Welcome and registrations (Piazza San Giovanni in Monte, 2, Aula Gualandi)
 
7.00-7.30 pm
Welcoming cocktail (Cortile Guido Fanti, Piazza Maggiore, 6)
 
8:00 pm
Lecture
SASKIA SASSEN, The Rise of Predatory Formations (Cortile Guido Fanti, Piazza Maggiore, 6, open to the public)
 
TUESDAY, JUNE 25
 
10.00-12.00 am
Morning course
 
2.00-4.00 pm
 
8:00 pm
Critical dialogue
 
THURSDAY, JUNE 27
FRIDAY, JUNE 28
 
10.00-12.00 am
Morning course
 
2.00-6.30 pm
Participants' papers (Piazza San Giovanni in Monte, 2, Aule Specola, open to the public)
 
MONDAY, JULY 1
 
8:00 pm
Public Debate
 
TUESDAY, JULY 2
THURSDAY, JULY 4
FRIDAY, JULY 5
 
10.00-12.00 am
Morning course
 
2.00-6.30 pm
Participants' papers (Piazza San Giovanni in Monte, 2, Aule Specola, open to the public)
 
7.00-7.30 pm
Closing cocktail (Cortile, Biblioteca dell'Archiginnasio, Piazza Galvani, 1)
 
8:00 pm
Closing lecture
DIDIER FASSIN, In the Shadow of the City: Planetary Punitivescapes (Cortile, Biblioteca dell'Archiginnasio, Piazza Galvani, 1, open to the public)
 

Valeria Raimondi

Ph.D candidate in Urban Studies at the Gran Sasso Science Institute - Social Sciences Unit, L’Aquila, Italy

Valeria Raimondi is a PhD candidate in Urban Studies at the Gran Sasso Science Institute - Social Sciences Unit, L’Aquila, Italy. She has a BA in International Cooperation and Development, and an MA in Geography and Territorial Processes (University of Bologna, Italy). Her current research revolves around Migration Studies and critical theory on the concept of Citizenship. She applies the theoretical framework in her analysis of migrant struggles in urban contexts, illuminating practices of self-organised reception for migrants in Athens, Greece, as spaces of autonomous geographies.

Tomas Percival

Ph.D candidate at the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, University of London / Lecturer in visual cultures at the University of California, Irvine

Tomas Percival is an artist and researcher. His project-based practice examines a number of socio-political issues related to the built environment, including questions of urban securitisation, governmentality, sovereignty, and rights. He holds an MFA in Art from the University of California, Los Angeles, and is a PhD candidate at the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, University of London. He has participated in residency programmes at the University of Fine Arts in Poznan and SOMA Mexico City, and exhibited his projects in Europe and the United States. He is currently a Lecturer in visual cultures at the University of California, Irvine.

Thiti Jamkajornkeiat

Ph.D Candidate at the University of California-Berkeley in South and Southeast Asian Studies

Thiti Jamkajornkeiat is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of California-Berkeley in South and Southeast Asian Studies with a designated emphasis in Critical Theory. His current dissertation project is an intellectual history of Marxist thought in Indonesia from 1940s-1960s, investigating the forms and modes of conceptual analysis, critique, and resistant practice emerging from a range of embodied thinkers in this period with a particular focus on the questions of peripheral Marxism, third worldism, internationalism, revolutionary subjectivities, Cold war political economy, and militarism. His recent publication on Southeast Asian Studies in Southeast Asia appears in Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia.

Stefan Yong

Ph.D student in History of Consciousness at the University of California, Santa Cruz

Stefan is a PhD student in History of Consciousness at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He holds a BA in Black Studies from Amherst College. His current project investigates the relations between late capitalist reconfigurations of global space and the spatial forms of cultural production. Appositely, his research interests include logistics and infrastructure, aesthetics of containerisation, Caribbean poetics of oceanic space, the black radical tradition, and Marxist literary theory. 

Sam Golter

Ph.D candidate in Critical and Comparative Studies in the Department of Music at the University of Virginia

I am a PhD candidate in Critical and Comparative Studies in the Department of Music at the University of Virginia, and I hold Masters degrees in Musicology and Flute Performance from the University of Oregon. I am interested in the political economy of music in industrial, post-industrial, and neoliberal capitalism and how recognizing its status as a crisis-inducing surplus object helps us understand its role in both consolidating and contesting meanings of race and sexuality.

Sadiq Toffa

Lecturer, School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics / Ph.D candidate, Centre for African and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Linguistics University of Cape Town

Lecturer, School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics

PhD candidate, Centre for African and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Linguistics

University of Cape Town

Sadiq Toffa graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Cape Town, received a Master of Human Settlements from the University of Leuven, and was a Visiting Researcher in Sociology in the Cities Programme and the Centre for the Study of Human Rights at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has been a Commonwealth scholar for development, a VLIR scholar for public leadership, and a Mellon scholar for cross-disciplinary research. He has also received awards for academic teaching, for professional design practice, and for cultural activism. His PhD is entitled ‘Aesthetics of the Postcolony: postliberal postsecular heritage of a South African ethnic ghetto'.

Russell Coldicutt

Ph.D candidate in English at Duke University

Russell Coldicutt is a doctoral candidate in English at Duke University and the assistant editor for NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction. His research interests include novel theory and the post-1945 novel, cybernetics, and the philosophy of technology. Building from those interests, Russell’s dissertation project turns to the means by which a range of seemingly different contemporary novels all expose and sometimes appropriate the infrastructure governing human life as information. He is interested in how the contemporary novel updates and revises the literary techniques and imagined spaces of the realist novel for the infrastructure spaces of multinational capitalism in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

Nicholas Scott

Ph.D student at the University of Virginia

Nicholas Scott is a PhD student at the University of Virginia. He holds a B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin and a M.A. from Tufts University. He is being broadly trained as a historian of modern Latin America and his research focuses on the history of the Chilean working class in Santiago during the twentieth century.  

Naume Zorodzai Choguya

Lecturer Sociology Department University of Zimbabwe / Ph.D Candidate Department of Anthropology & Sociology University of the Western Cape

Lecturer 

Sociology Department

University of Zimbabwe 

Harare, Zimbabwe

 

PhD Candidate

Department of Anthropology & Sociology 

University of the Western Cape 

South Africa 

Mauricio Rogat

Ph.D Candidate, School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg

I am a second year PhD student in anthropology. My research is concerned partly with a logistical management of migrants’ movement on a national level taking shape after the events in 2015 referred to as the “migration crisis” in popular discourse and partly with housing conditions on a local level, in Stockholm Sweden. Through fieldwork conducted in areas around in Stockholm county with temporary provisional housing solutions, such as modular houses, container dwellings and barracks, I investigate spaces of struggles and contestations emerging out of the management and organisation of movement. I am interested in politics of dispersal and distribution, the materialisation of temporary architecture, and the struggles arising out of this organisation.

Maha Kouas

Ph.D Student in a Joint-doctoral Thesis at the University of Tunis and l’Ecole Polytechnique de Bruxelles

Maha Kouas is an Architect and Urban planner, graduated from the National School of Architecture and Urbanism of Tunis (ENAU). In addition to working at her own firm of Architecture and Urban planning based in Tunis, she is enrolled in a joint-PhD in Urban sociology at the University of Tunis, Tunisia and in Building & Town planning at l’Ecole Polytechnique de Bruxelles-ULB, Belgium. Her research interests focus on the development of the Tunis metropolitan region and the increase of its socio-spatial inequalities.

Maha participated in different international scientific symposiums and workshops in Tunisia, France, Spain, Belgium, Germany and Italy, on topics related to urban transformations, local governance, renewable energy, natural hazard and sustainability. Moreover, Maha is an active member of the “Union of Young Tunisian Urban planners”, which aims to support urban policy and the consecration of urban decentralization in Tunisia.

Luca Villaggi

Master's student in Sociology and Social Research

I lived in Piacenza until 2015, when I moved to Bologna in order to attend my University courses. I graduated in Economics in October 2018 at the University of Bologna and I wrote my thesis in Economic and Labor Sociology under the supervision of professor Federico Chicchi, studying the way the French School of Regulation analyzed the crisis of Fordism. 
I am currently attending the master's degree in Sociology and Social Research and I would like to study the transformations of economic processes, citizenship and welfare systems and how they manifest in urban spaces. 

Lisa Beyeler-Yvarra

ThM candidate at Duke University

Lisa Beyeler-Yvarra is a ThM candidate at Duke University. She holds a BLA from the University of Washington and has over a decade of experience as a landscape architect and urban designer, contributing to public and private projects across the United States. Her current research interests bring together historical theology, trauma theory, postcolonial studies, and urban history to examine the invisible ways religious power relations are encoded in the built environment.

Linsey Ly

Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Linsey Ly is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her dissertation, “Architectures of Absence”, examines the accumulation of modern ghost cities in China and their convergence with rare earths mining as a process terraforming the industrial north into a  palimpsest of spectral/spectacular landscapes. Linsey’s work addresses how the deep time of Earth’s geologic pasts confront the promissory futures of the Chinese state and the multiple temporalities rerouting the chronopolitical stakes of governance. Rare earth metals, futurist cities, and other topographies of absence are sites and material forms where we can trace an emergent alignment of politics with the inorganic afterlives of the broken land. Broader research interests include social theory, aesthetics, new materialism, and conceptual lexicons of continental philosophy.

Lily Kwong

Designer

Lily Kwong is the founder of STUDIO LILY KWONG, a next-generation landscape design firm whose mission is to reconnect people to nature. SLK specializes in creating dynamic environments that combine horticulture, urban planning, architecture, education and visual arts. The goal is to create a cultural impact through the lens of the natural world. Lily earned her degree in Urban Studies from Columbia University, and was recently named by the New York Times as one of the "9 Young New Yorkers Poised for Creative Greatness" & inducted into Forbes' 30 Under 30 Class of 2018 in the Art & Style category.

Laura Fracalanza

Ph.D Student in Comparative Studies, University of Lisbon

Laura Fracalanza is a PhD Student in Comparative Studies at the University of Lisbon, where she develops a project titled “Reading Rio de Janeiro through Palestinian Lens: Artistic Practices Confronting the Politics of Inclusive Exclusion”. She holds a BA in Modern Languages and Cultures from the University of Genova and a MA in Postcolonial Literatures from the University of Bologna. Her research aims at analyzing cultural productions that represent, embody, question and/or challenge the sociopolitical fragmentation of the spaces where they are produced, focusing on the favelas of Rio de Janeiro and Palestine.

Koffi Nomedji

Ph.D candidate in Duke University’s Cultural Anthropology department

Koffi Nomedji is a PhD candidate in Duke University’s Cultural Anthropology department. With a previous academic background in Economics and Sociology, Koffi’s primary interest examines the ways in which coastal erosion inflects West African countries' socio-political domain. Focusing on Togo and Ghana, his dissertation research is concerned with the making and remaking of old declining cities and new emerging ones by the erosion phenomenon. His main approach to this question is to situate and to critically think the current forms of these urbanscapes within their historical contexts.

Katherine Anson

Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish and Latin American Cultural Studies at Wittenberg University

Katherine Anson is originally from Colombia. She earned her Ph.D. in Latin American Literature and Cultural Studies from The University of Arizona, where she also received a B.A in Sociology. Her work concentrates on the effects of literature and culture in the urban development(and resistance dynamics) of the Latin American cities.  Katherine is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish and Latin American Cultural Studies at Wittenberg University. She is currently working on a  project that explores cultural activism in contemporary Bogotá’s and Mexico City’s anti-gentrification movements.

Juana Salcedo

Architect and scholar from Colombia

I am a practicing architect and scholar from Colombia, working in the intersection of architecture and urbanism. I studied Architecture (2009) and History (2010) at Universidad de Los Andes and a Master of Environmental Design at Yale University (2013). I work as a designer and consultant, and teach in the School of Architecture at Universidad de Los Andes. I am interested in exploring transdisciplinary conceptual and methodological approaches to address the ecological flows, population movements, and economic operations that define South American urban landscapes. This concern includes inquiring for design strategies that work towards sustainable design interventions on the public sphere and exploring visualization and mapping as key means to foreground spatial issues and territorial discussions to broader audiences.

My current research delves on the frictions between infrastructure and ecology over the urban and rural landscapes that intersect with the Regional Integration of South American Infrastructure IIRSA and the Jaguar Corridor Initiative projects of South American integration. I consider it essential to ask if it is possible to reconcile the development aims with the preservation of the ecological diversity of the continent. The way cities are redesigned and managed has definitive consequences over the larger environmental dynamics at play in the quest for South American integration.

Joella Bitter

Ph.D candidate at Duke University in cultural anthropology

Joella is a doctoral candidate at Duke University in cultural anthropology with a certificate in gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Her dissertation, based on research in Gulu, Uganda, explores how sounding and listening inform and animate practices of city-making and aims to interrogate (often racialized and gendered) assumptions about what a 'city' looks and feels. Her work traverses various fields including anthropology of sound and the senses, science and technology studies, feminist and postcolonial theories, and urban political ecology. 

Jill Diane Pope

Ph.D candidate in geography (urban studies) at University of Lausanne

Jill Diane Pope – PhD candidate in geography (urban studies) at University of Lausanne

My research explores the interplay between everyday urban political practices and multi-dimensional in-betweenness in Belgrade and Belfast – two post-conflict cities situated on the edge of Europe. Using a conceptual framework drawn from queer, feminist and decolonial theory I seek to understand how artistic and cultural practices work with and against the ambivalent conditions of life in these cities to imagine and enact alternate social worlds.

Jessica Breakey

Associate Lecturer at the University of Witwatersrand

Jessica is an Associate Lecturer at the University of Witwatersrand where she teaches Sociology of Artificial Intelligence to Electrical and Information Engineers. She also works as a Researcher for the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit (SALDRU) where she forms part of a team working towards designing meaningful interventions into South Africa's growing youth unemployment. Jessica holds an MPhil from Cambridge University (2018) where her research looked at the Sociology of Algorithms. In 2017 Jessica graduated with an MA by Research from the University of Witwatersrand where her dissertation offered a series of reflections on the fire-centered politics of the 2015/2016 South African student movements. 

Javiera Luisina Cádiz Bedini

MA Candidate in Art History at the University of Barcelona

Javiera Luisina Cádiz Bedini was born in Chile and raised in Argentina and South Africa. She is currently completing an MA at the University of Barcelona and also holds degrees from the University of Siena, Italy, and the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Her research engages the connected histories of art and resistance from Africa, Europe and Latin America and centres on curatorship that looks at postcolonial artistic and performative practice and production. Javiera wants to contribute to an archive that asks— and attempts to answer— questions about exile, memory and silenced histories.

Itandehui Reyes-Díaz

Ph.D student in Sociology at Autonomous University of Puebla, Mexico

PhD in Sociology at Autonomous University of Puebla, Mexico

Itandehui has a degree in Political Communication studies from the National Autonomous University of Mexico. She is currently enrolled in the second year of the Ph.D. Sociology “Community Weavings and Forms of Politics" at the Autonomous University of Puebla. Her research project deals with the scales and temporalities of the women's movement against violence in Mexico and its production of space, narrative, knowledge and political form. She is interested in the feminist critique of heterosexuality and contemporary debates in anti-colonialism. Keywords: body-territory, interdependence, femicide as dispossession, segregative and peripheral landscape, territorial violence, and embodied research.

Irene Peano

Post-doctoral researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon

Irene Peano holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Cambridge and is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon, within an ERC Project titled 'The colour of labour: the racialised lives of migrants'. Her main research areas include migration and labour (particularly sex work and farm labour), especially from the point of view of subjectification and resistance and in relation to patterns of containment and exploitation in their various (spatial, material, discursive, legal, intersubjective, affective) dimensions. Among these, processes of racialization and gendering are prominent focuses of her analysis. Besides engaging in participatory research, she also investigates these issues through genealogical methods, focusing specifically on the afterlives of forms of forced labour, racialisation and techniques of containment.

Hayley Elszasz

Ph.D Student in Politics at the University of Virginia

Hayley is a PhD Student in Politics at the University of Virginia, with a major field of Comparative Politics and minor field of Political Theory. Hayley is particularly interested in African politics and decolonial theory. Her recent work looks at how the afterlives of colonialism and slavery continue to reproduce a hierarchical world order.

Gray F. Kidd

Ph.D. candidate in Latin American history at Duke University

Gray F. Kidd is a Ph.D. candidate in Latin American history at Duke University. His dissertation project, entitled “Escape from the Big House: Race, Sociability, and the Politics of ‘Culture’ in Recife, Brazil, 1968-1986,” looks at how a unique turma (class, clique) of creative intellectuals debated what constituted ‘popular’ culture in a regionally important, if burgeoning, port city in Northeast Brazil between dictatorship (1964-1985) and redemocratization (c. 1979-1985). Drawing on a rich array of texts, including diaries, crônicas, photographs, super-8 films, sculptures, and plays, it reminds us that we have much to learn about intellectuals, intellectualities, and the political meanings of culture beyond the Rio de Janeiro-São Paulo axis.

Erol Köymen

PhD candidate in ethnomusicology at the University of Chicago

Erol Koymen is currently a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology at the University of Chicago. He received his Bachelor’s degree from Vanderbilt University in 2011 and his master’s degree in musicology from the University of Texas at Austin in 2016. His research interests are primarily in modernist and avant-garde music and art in Turkey, sound studies, and postcolonialism. His dissertation project, “Sonic Occidentalism: Sound, Space, and Race in Turkish Modernity,” will draw on fieldwork in Ankara, Istanbul, and Berlin to investigate emergent transnational musical networks and modes of resistance.

Emily Mellen

Ph.D student at the University of Virginia

Emily is a second year PhD student in critical and comparative studies of music at the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on storytelling, voice, and digital archive production within the context of colonial and postcolonial urban North Africa, particularly Morocco. Her areas of interest include Music, Sound, and Creative Cultural Production of North Africa, Voice Studies, Sound Studies, Postcolonial Theory, Music, Movement, and Altered States of Consciousness, Ethnography, and Postcolonial and Feminist Digital Humanities. She received a BA from the University of California at Los Angeles in Music History and Arabic and Islamic Studies in 2016 with a thesis on singers Umm Kulthum and Fairuz and the rise of pan-Arab nationalism and nationalist movements in Egypt and Lebanon.

Emanuele Sigismondi

Graduate student at the Global Cultures program at the University of Bologna

Emanuele Sigismondi received a bachelor in Foreign Languages and Literatures at University of Bologna and is currently a graduate student at the Global Cultures program at the same university. His main interests of research are historical theory and the history of political thought. He is working on the history of the concepts of ‘people’ and ‘multitude’ in 17th-century English political thought.

Ellison Tjirera

Teacher of Sociology at the University of Namibia, Windhoek

Ellison Tjirera teaches Sociology at the University of Namibia, Windhoek. For the past eight years as a researcher, Tjirera has been associated with the Windhoek based think tank, the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) as well as the Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare. His academic interests include urban studies, post-apartheid societies, parliamentary democracy, gender studies and governance issues. Tjirera holds an MA in Sociology from the University of Namibia and recently submitted his PhD thesis at the University of the Witwatersrand where he has been a fellow of the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (WiSER) since 2013.

Coleen Holloway

Master's student in the Global Cultures curriculum at the Department of History and Cultures, University of Bologna

Coleen Holloway is in her final year as a master’s student in the Global Cultures curriculum at the Department of History and Cultures, University of Bologna. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Seattle University, United States. Her research interests are in political philosophy, urban politics, and labor history. Her current work is on the interplay between race and correctional control in the American labor movement beginning in the 1960s.

Christian Sowa

Ph.D Candidate at the Department of Development Studies at SOAS, University of London

Christian Sowa is a PhD Candidate at the Department of Development Studies at SOAS, University of London. His research focuses on the camp/city dyad by analyzing refugee accommodation in Berlin. The project is based on qualitative research and aims to bring together debates from border studies (around Balibar) and urban studies (around Lefebvre). Christian received a BA from FU Berlin and an MA from Columbia University with a focus on political theory, human geography and anthropology. Besides his research, he is involved in Right to the City groups in Berlin.

Camilla De Ambroggi

Graduate student in the curriculum “Global Cultures” of the Master Program in Historical and Oriental Sciences at the University of Bologna

I am Camilla De Ambroggi, a graduate student in the curriculum “Global Cultures” of the Master Program in Historical and Oriental Sciences at the University of Bologna. I have recently obtained my master’s degree with an ethnographic thesis based on a fieldwork period in Bolivia. My research focuses on the critical analysis of the Guaraní indigenous autonomies of Bolivia and on the effects that the neoliberal policies of Evo Morales’ government are having in these indigenous territories in term of subjectification processes and of reconfiguration of power relations. My main research interests include feminist thought, postcolonial and decolonial studies, contemporary social and territorial movements in Bolivia and critical theory.

Barış Yüksel

Student in Global Cultures master program at the University of Bologna

My name is Barış Yüksel; I am a student in Global Cultures master program at the University of Bologna. My current research is the ways how large-scale infrastructural urban projects are situated in the processes of redefining borders of global cities. Besides, I am interested in the confluence of masculinities, sociability, and taste within globally informed settings. More broadly, I endeavour to grasp the production of spaces regarding subjectivities while operations of capital at play.

Anna Guerini

Ph.D candidate in Global Histories, Cultures, and Politics at the University of Bologna

I am currently enrolled in the first year of the PhD program in Global Histories, Cultures, and Politics at the University of Bologna. I am researching on the conceptions of democracy and society of Alexis de Tocqueville and Gustave de Beaumont, in order to understand how the forms and the extension of government work and change in relation to un-equal and disordered subjectivities, such as poor people, black people, prisoners, colonized people, and women. The aim is to articulate the analysis of these themes connecting them in a global perspective, focusing on the interconnection of colonial and western societies. For my master’s degree dissertation, I have investigated the role of the Myth of the Negro in Frantz Fanon’s thought, confronting it to post-colonial and cultural studies. I am also interested in modern and contemporary feminist political theory.

Angela Harris Sánchez

Ph.D candidate and early stage researcher at the University of Granada

My name is Angela Harris Sánchez and I am currently a PhD candidate and an early stage researcher at the University of Granada. I hold a degree in Art History, an masters degree in Art Therapy and in Gender and postcolonial studies. In my current dissertation, I am approaching new conceptions of the art space, working through different critiques that allow me to bring together my main interests: the use of art as a counter-hegemonic language in order to enact spaces of desire, activism, pleasure, self-organization and communality. I intend to create new epistemologies that can decentralize power inside knowledges and I think this summer school also presents itself as a new location to generate relationalities that possibilize this.

Andreina Torres Angarita

Ph.D Candidate in Cultural Anthropology and fellow at the Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies at City University of New York- Graduate Center

Andreina Torres is a Doctoral Candidate in Cultural Anthropology and is a fellow at the Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies at City University of New York- Graduate Center. She is currently in the writing stage of her dissertation which deals with housing activism and affective politics in Caracas Venezuela. Her areas of interest include urban anthropology, gender studies and the anthropology of property. She also holds an MSc in Gender and Development Studies from FLACSO-Ecuador and a BA in Art History and International Development Studies from McGill University.  

Alioscia Castronovo

Ph.D candidate in Urban Studies at DICEA, La Sapienza / Ph.D at IDAES UNSAM in Buenos Aires

Alioscia Castronovo is anthropologist and activist of student and social movements, between Europe and South America. He graduated in Anthropology at Sapienza University of Rome, and his actually PhD student in Urban Studies at DICEA, La Sapienza, with double supervision at Social Anthropology PhD at IDAES UNSAM in Buenos Aires, where he is developing his ethnographic fieldwork on self managed labour experiences in popular economies, focusing on processes of subjectivation, popular urbanization and production of the common in cooperatives and recuperated factories in Buenos Aires metropolitan area.

He is member of the transnational CLACSO working group "Popular economies: theoretical and practical mapping", of the "International Workers' Economy Network" and the Colabor Platform, a collaborative research project focused on self education and social innovation in self-managed cooperatives and recuperated factories.

Ali M. Ugurlu

Ph.D student in the department of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies at Columbia University

Ali M. Ugurlu is a PhD student in the department of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies at Columbia University. His current research interests lie at the intersection of intellectual history and capitalization processes of the late Ottoman Empire. Thinking against disciplinary and conceptual divisions throughout theories of the subject, he grapples with the material conditions of possibility that have enabled the discourse of secularism to emerge amongst Ottoman intellectuals in the late 19th century.

Alexis Miller

Ph.D student in UVa's Politics Department

Alexis Miller is a third-year Ph.D student in UVa's Politics Department. Her major area of focus is American politics, with a minor in political theory. My research interests include racial and ethnic politics, urban and local politics, and the politics of respectability grounded in Black Feminist theory. 

Alex Demshock

Doctoral student in sociology at Rutgers University

Alex Demshock is a doctoral student in sociology at Rutgers University. She works on the production of urban safety and its role in the production of race, gender, and the built environment in Haiti, France, and the United States. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Urban Studies and American History from Barnard College and her Master of Arts in Sociology from Rutgers. Her dissertation is a comparative relational study of urban renewal in Paris, Port-au-Prince, and Miami. Prior to pursuing a graduate degree, Alex worked in public and higher education in Philadelphia and Newark.

Alex Demshock is a doctoral student in sociology at Rutgers University. She works on the production of urban safety and its role in the production of race, gender, and the built environment in Haiti, France, and the United States. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Urban Studies and American History from Barnard College and her Master of Arts in Sociology from Rutgers. Her dissertation is a comparative relational study of urban renewal in Paris, Port-au-Prince, and Miami. Prior to pursuing a graduate degree, Alex worked in public and higher education in Philadelphia and Newark.